Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Vacation Week is Almost Here with Aesop's Fables!

Aesop's Fables! 
by WonderSpark Puppets
Thurs | April 11 | 10:30 AM
Fri  | April 12 | 10:30 AM
Sat | April 13 | 1 & 3 PM
Sun | April 14 | 1& 3 PM

Are you counting the days until April School Vacation Week like we are? Before our Vaca-week programing is in full swing, stop by the theatre for the delightful performance of "Aesop's Fables" by WonderSpark Puppets! What better way to teach and entertain than with Aesop’s fables! Join us for a great time while learning lessons from these classic tales including "Lion and the Mouse" and "Tortoise and the "Hare."

About the Show:  A hilarious spin on Aesop's Fables with tabletop puppets performed by WonderSpark Puppets. This highly interactive performance of timeless moral stories includes 'The Lion and the Mouse', 'The Ant and The Grasshopper' and the 'Tortoise and the Hare.' Along the way, we also learn the four seasons, the power of kindness and good sportsmanship.

About the Performers: WonderSpark Puppets (New York City, NY) was founded by husband and wife team, Chad Williams and Lindsey “Z” Briggs who infuse fun and whimsy into all their performances. Z Briggs has worked as a professional puppeteer for the last 7 years as a performer and builder on numerous projects including most recently Alissa Hunnicutt's The Kid Inside, Jonny Clockworks' Edward Lear's Absurd Ditties, Lone Wolf Tribes' Bride (2009 UNIMA Award), and the character Lottie Lamb on the PBS kids show Seemore's Playhouse. Chad Williams is a filmmaker turned puppeteer, having shot and edited two puppetry documentaries: Puppet Fest '09 and Puppet Rampage.

Where do the tales of Aesop come from? Who is Aesop? 

Legend has it, the tales known as Aesop’s fables were created by an ancient Greek slave who earned his freedom. The stories were some of the world's first morality tales, originating in the sixth century B.C. Aesop's fables use animal characters to mock human folly and are also the source of many enduring cultural images and idioms.

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